Skip to main content

About your Search

20121223
20121223
STATION
CSPAN 10
LANGUAGE
English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:05pm EST
to develop their own energy, like we've seen in north dakota and pennsylvania, the revenues that come into the government help to build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that's an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. and when states can control more of their transportation and infrastructure dollars that can be more efficient and do much better than we are or what we can do now under the federal regime, so the principles of freedom are working all over the country. we need to spotlight them, showcase them, communicate them all over the country, so that people see that these ideas work and at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas that are in place are not working. they're dragging us down. and so when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas, but with american ideas. ideas that we know are working and can point to and show that they're working for 100% of americ
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00pm EST
to the energy legislation where byrd worked tirelessly on it to get it done without a filibuster. he had the sense that the senate leader should have a special relationship with the president and that is the way the system was supposed to work. of course, the most important in for the senate leader is to make the senate work. byrd knew the senate rules better than any person that ever lived. he lived in dealing with the notion of the fear of a paralyzed senate. he wanted to think that the rules worked, but he knew that in fact jim allen of alabama had cracked the code. he had figured out how to have this filibuster so the senate could be tied up in paralyzed. robert byrd like to think you have to be an expert to do this , but it turned out you do not need to be an expert at all. a couple of senators did not know the rules and they tied the senate up. byrd struggled with the notion of how to keep the unique character of the senate without having a paralyzed? in that regard, he championed rules change. he got some done in 1979. he knew that the senate rules do not work. if they were not fi
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:35pm EST
're moving to where they can thrive. and this benefits every american. we look at energy development and we talk about that at the national level of how it can create prosperity for our country if we open it up. we don't have to guess at whether or not it works. i mean, we can look at north dakota, you can look at pennsylvania. states that have gone around the federal rules and figured out how to develop their own energy are creating jobs and tax revenue to their governments. they were able to lower their taxes, use the revenue to improve everything about their states. and here we make it political and partisan on whether or not our country can develop more and more energy. but at the state level it's just about what works. and all we have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00am EST
to see energy and creativity of america's youth as they make positive choices in their lives and refuting the prodrug messages that overwhelm them. we continue to support that message. i will turn us back over to dr. stein. thank you very much. [applause] >> our next speaker is dr. lloyd johnson who is the distinguished senior research scientist at the university of michigan social research and the principal investigator of the monitoring the future studies since its inception in 1975, which is an amazing contribution he has provided to understand the trends in the drug use. he served as an adviser to the white house, congress, and many international bodies and has conducted research in a wide variety of issues including the use of alcohol, tobacco and various illicit drugs. [applause] >> thank you very much. good morning to all of you. i am pleased so many of you have turned out. it is a pleasure to announce results from the steady joining dr. koh and dr. volkow. despite all of the years, i actually get younger. each time we do a survey, a special arrangements. you have heard a lot of th
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:30am EST
was and that is where we spent our time and energies on. >> you do not know who changed ?t and thr >> i do not. >> i think there is some testimony with respect to that within the intel community. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i think the report, the accountability review report cluster is honest in pointing out the mistakes were made within the agency. hopefully now as the result of the report, as you all have indicated, we can move forward and hold people accountable and make the appropriate changes and follow-up on the lessons that are learned as a result of this tragedy in benghazi. i appreciate secretary clinton's taking responsibility for what happened. as she points out in her letter to this committee, going even further than the recommendations in the report to address the mistakes we made. >> i went to the letter from sector clinton to me and to senator lugar and the record at this time. >> one of the things you pointed out is that you have gone out -- there have been teams to assess the 19 state department locations around the world where there are high risk areas. i wonder if you can talk ab
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:33pm EST
, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people lot more thoughtful, and much give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are actingwe have to get the aligned. that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can get 100% of what they want. this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who does not. there are real world consequences to what we do h
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 4:20am EST
to focus more on as opposed to spending so much energy on the national level. we have not seen the opposition come together until the recent coalition, which i am actually quite hopeful about. what we have seen is the legitimacy has been derived from the ground up and enter syria. as for the military opposition as well as the political opposition. the stability after assad is they will have to accept a decentralized state. it does not need to be a hard line drawn. what i do see happening is an agreement between the central government and local government a local government will be stronger here and the central government is not going to have authority over syria. if any central power can come in after the fact and try to do that, they will undermine stability. in order to actually have reconciliation, i think the first up is going to be to get the armed opposition to coalesce around an organization that can credibly guarantee a monopoly on the use of force of the area controls. i think we have the beginnings of that, finally, with this new military coalition. beethe group inclu
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)